For Saybrook Students

Louis Hoffman, PhD is a faculty member at Saybrook in the Department of Humanistic and Clinical Psychology. He teaches primarily in the Existential, Humanistic, and Transpersonal Psychology Specialization; however, he also teaches in the Creativity Studies and Consciousness, Spirituality, and Integrative Health Specializations as well as in the Transformative Social Change Degree Program. He is available for essays, theses, and dissertations.

Essays

I am available to chair and serve on essay committees at Saybrook University. If you are considering talking with me about chairing or serving on your committee, I would encourage you to review my vita to get a sense of my interests and professional experience. I would also encourage you to set up a time to meet at one of the Saybrook Residential Conferences or schedule a time to talk by phone or Skype.

Essay Recommendations and Guides

Masters Thesis/Project

I am available to chair and serve on Masters theses and projects at Saybrook University. If you are considering talking with me about serving on your committee, I would encourage you to review my vita to get a sense of my interests and professional experience. I would also encourage you to set up a time to meet at one of the Saybrook Residential Conferences or schedule a time to talk by phone or Skype.

Masters Thesis/Project Recommendations and Guides

Dissertation

I am available to chair and serve on dissertation committees. If we did not work together on your essays and you are considering talking with me about your dissertation, I would suggest that you begin by reviewing my vita to get a sense of my interests and professional experience. I would also encourage you to set up a time to meet at one of the Saybrook Residential Conferences or schedule a time to talk by phone or Skype.

Dissertation Recommendations and Guides


We dishonor those early influential thinkers in our movement when we turn them into idols. We distort the message they were bringing to us and the message they lived in their lives. I believe (and hope) that if these figures were around today that their harshest critiques would be of the way we over-revere their contributions. We love and honor our heroes when we recognize their humanity. To be revered as an idol or infallible scholar is much less of an honor than to be revered as a human who within all the limitations of being human rose to contribute a unique voice and make an important, though imperfect, contribution worthy of a lasting influence on the history of humankind.

— Louis Hoffman, The Proper Use of Tradition and Scholarly Authority